Update: Since publishing this post, we’ve received information that while both Gmail and Microsoft will both update their DMARC policies this year, both policy updates will likely happen closer to the end of 2016. It never hurts to be ahead of the game though, so go ahead and ensure you’re email program is prepared sooner than later. 

Happy June! You may have heard rumblings of it, but DMARC changes from major inbox providers Microsoft and Gmail are about to shake up things in the world of email authentication. (Asking yourself, “What is DMARC?” Check out this post.)

Both Microsoft and Gmail have reported that changes to their DMARC policies will be happening “in June” of this year and unfortunately, haven’t provided more detail since. To arm yourself with the latest news and to find out what you need to do to prepare your email program, listen in to our delivery consultant Jacob Hansen’s mini webcast (just under ten minutes) on the subject below.

*For a quick overview of what DMARC is and its benefits, start from the beginning. If you just want the news on Gmail and Microsoft, start at 6:46!

 

Additional DMARC Resources

Video Highlights

  • No one other than Gmail (the entity itself) can send from “@gmail.com”
  • No one other than Microsoft (the entity itself) can send from:
    • “@hotmail.com”
    • “@outlook.com”
    • “@live.com”
    • “@msn.com”
  • If you do try to send from these sending domains after their new DMARC policies go into place, your mail will be rejected
  • What will happen with country extensions (e.g. “@live.co.uk”) is still to be determined
  • Double check that your email program only sends through a domain you own and control

If you’re a SendGrid customer and would like a little extra help with the technical side of sending email (a review of your current sending practices and inbox delivery rates, IP and whitelabel setup, email authentication, etc.), give our email delivery services a gander!



Kate Schmeisser
When Kate isn't trying to teach herself the ukelele, make it through the mountain of books on her nightstand, or figure out if they are actually being serious about suggested serving sizes on ice cream, she is the Creative Content Manager.