ENTREE - The Pacific Northwest Inlander

View in web browser
Entree

SUBSCRIBE |SHARE | SUBMIT STORY IDEAS

11.14.13

Pinot's Palette

ART AND BOOZE

While at a bar have you ever had the burning desire to whip out an easel and canvas and paint up a masterpiece right there? Maybe not. But a new place opening in Spokane thinks painting and drinking make for a good combination.

Jackie Casey plans to open Pinot's Palette by January at a location that was formerly a wine bar on the east side of downtown (32 W. 2nd Ave.). How it works is Casey will hire local artists to come in and teach how to do certain paintings step by step, she says. Pinot's provides the supplies and you purchase beer and wine from their bar to sip on while you paint.

"I want to do as local as possible," Casey says. "There are so many good wineries and breweries in Spokane, around Spokane and in Washington in general."

Casey was living in Tulsa, Okla. for the last few years when she first went to a Pinot's Palette there and says she loved it. "I just decided to dive in and open one of my own," she says, adding that she's from the Northwest and wanted to return.

Pinot's Palette is a franchise that started in Houston, and the Spokane location will be its 52nd location and the first one in Washington. Classes are scheduled to be Thursday ($35/2 hours), Friday and Saturday evenings ($45/3 hours) for ages 21-and-over only.

And for all of you non-artists scared to try painting in public, Casey says you'll be able to do it. "All the paintings are made for people who have never painted before," she says.

JO MILLER

CHAIRS PUBLIC HOUSE IS ALMOST HERE

Chairs Public House, an offshoot of popular coffee shop Chairs Coffee, is aiming for a soft opening the middle of next week, says Chris Nichols, one of the owners. It's opening in the former location of the Bulldog Tavern near Gonzaga University at 1305 N. Hamilton St. In the mornings Chairs Public House will be very much a coffee shop, but in the evenings it will turn into a bar, Nichols says, adding that ideally they're hoping to be open from 6 am-2am. They plan to serve the full gamut of coffee, espresso, beer, wine and spirits. Expect it to be "gastropub-ish," Nichols says. They have plans for a full menu with breakfast, lunch and dinner, serving items such as avocado fries and zucchini fries as appetizers, plus choices like sandwiches, burgers and flatbreads.

JO MILLER

Masselows

Scotch Social

Davenport

Mustard Seed

Prospectors

Culinary Calendar
space
space space

Holiday Eating Tips

Unitarian Universalist Church | 4340 W. Fort George Wright Dr.

Workshop on healthy-eating habits to rely on during the holiday feasting season. | Nov. 16 at 9:30 am | Free | 951-7574more...

space
space
space
space space

Inland Northwest Vegan Society Potluck

The Community Building | 35 W. Main Ave.

Bring a plant-based (no animal products or honey) dish to share along with an ingredient list and the recipe. Dinner is followed by a guest speaker. | Nov. 17 at 5 pm | Free, donations accepted | 315-2852more...

space
space
space
space space

Thanksgiving Cooking Class

Jacklin Arts & Cultural Center | 405 N. William St., Post Falls

Chef Bob Black teaches a class featuring recipes from six regions across the U.S. | Nov. 18 at 5:30 pm | $50 per person | 208-457-8950more...

space
space
space

Flying Goat

Inlander Food

Spokane Public Market

Manito Tap House

Find more Places To Eat at Inlander.com


space
space space Small Plates
space

The Surf Shack

356 E. Appleway Ave., CdA
208-669-6966

Gary Kender talks about food like he's telling a love story. He links good food with good memories, whether he's recalling a recent meal at a Spokane restaurant, cooking meals for his five kids or recounting the steak dinner he shared with his wife on their recent honeymoon.

He's also stoked on all the ideas he has for The Surf Shack - his burger place in Coeur d'Alene - to make it into a franchise that serves wholesome burgers and plays up the '50s surf culture theme.
"This is my passion in life, as twisted as it may seem to some people," he says.

As a surfer originally from Long Beach, Calif., Kender moved to Idaho in 1991 and started a place in Hayden called Schoonerville. After 13 years he sold that and opened Longboard Burgers inside an A & D Mini Mart in Coeur d'Alene. For the few years it was open, Longboard was always packed, he says. But then Kender lost the business in a divorce and Longboard closed.
"For the four years I didn't have it, I couldn't go in a store without someone asking when I'd open another burger place," he says.

After the space went through a few hands, Kender got it back and reopened his burger place in July, this time calling it The Surf Shack because the divorce kept him from using the name Longboard.
"As long as there's a surfboard on the building, they'll know it's me," he says.
more...

space
space

Mad Bomber Brewing Co.

9265 N. Government Way, Hayden
208-762-7343

If Tom Applegate looks shell-shocked, it's not combat-induced. After all, the former Army Explosive Ordinance Disposal technician is used to stress. But after years of planning - including a few setbacks - Mad Bomber Brewing Company welcomed about 500 customers to its soft opening last week.

"We just posted [the opening] on Facebook," says Applegate, Mad Bomber's brewmaster, whose initial plans were to open a brewery with his father in their native Montana.

"It's impossible to do the job and it not have an impact," says Applegate, nodding toward photos of on-duty servicemen, including one reminiscent of The Hurt Locker's lonely walk scene. Ceramic tiles engraved with names of the EOD fallen line the bar. A chalkboard sign announces that select proceeds go toward EOD's Wounded Warrior Fund.

Instead, Applegate teamed with his wife Stephanie and two EOD buddies, John Taylor and Alan Longacre, to open Mad Bomber's modest one-and-a-quarter-barrel operation. An initial partner in the business, Staff Sergeant Nicholas Reid, died last year at 26 from injuries he suffered in an enemy explosive attack during his second tour in Afghanistan.

"It's impossible to do the job and it not have an impact," says Applegate, nodding toward photos of on-duty servicemen, including one reminiscent of The Hurt Locker's lonely walk scene. Ceramic tiles engraved with names of the EOD fallen line the bar. A chalkboard sign announces that select proceeds go toward EOD's Wounded Warrior Fund. more...

space
space

SUBSCRIBE | UNSUBSCRIBE | SHARE

The Inlander

FOR ADVERTISING INFORMATION: (509) 325-0634
1227 West Summit Parkway, Spokane, WA 99201