Category Archives: Technical

Open Source Documentation: One Year Later

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A year ago, we open sourced our documentation, with the hypothesis that it would improve the docs by adding feedback loops and removing barriers that discourage contribution. We also wanted to share what we had learned during the process. I’m glad to say that so far the results have been good, and the decision to open source our documentation continues to help us improve it as a product. Where We Are Now We’ve had 59 different contributors to the docs repo since we open sourced it, with around 15 of those contributors being community members rather than SendGrid employees. Considering

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Migrating an App to SendGrid’s Template Engine

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I’ve built a lot of applications to demonstrate what SendGrid can do over the past few years. Recently, I’ve started either updating them, getting rid of really old ones, or replacing them with newer ideas and more modernised examples. With the apps I’ve been updating, the biggest change has been removing all of the inline template code for the emails being generated by the app and moving it to SendGrid’s Template Engine, leaving behind a much cleaner looking codebase and a much more manageable set of templates. Migrating a simple app to Template Engine is really easy, here’s how I

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The Magic Behind Basic HTTP Authentication

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  It’s very easy to take things for granted as a developer. We almost always try and use libraries for every and anything to not reinvent the wheel. As I continue to grow, I find myself with a desire to dig deeper and understand the “black boxes” I’ve come to know. Recently, a beginner friend came to me needing a very simple authentication system. I told him about basic HTTP authentication to which he replied, “Sounds cool! How does it work?” I realized I had no idea and pulled up the spec. This one’s for you, Zack! When a request

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Play Reversi Using SendGrid

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The following is a guest post by Wataru Sato, a developer who works with SendGrid in Japan. He has a blog at http://awwa500.blogspot.jp/ and you can find his GitHub page here: https://github.com/awwa. I’m from Japan and work with SendGrid there. SendGrid is a powerful email service that sends a large number of emails every day. However, SendGrid’s APIs can also be used for fun! Today, I created a game using SendGrid. It’s called SendGrid-Reversi, and it let’s you play Reversi entirely over email! It runs on Sinatra, the data is stored in MongoDB, and the functionality is built on top of the various

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Send Emails That Don’t Bite With Barke

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People are different. They read their email at different times and in different ways. But it’s not easy to track and react to different users’ habits. That’s the idea behind Embarke, a partner of ours that optimizes the delivery time of each email you send. Embarke mimics our Web API and then consumes data provided by our Event Webhook to allow users to continue sending through SendGrid with minimal changes on their end. To start using Embarke, all one needs to do is change their endpoint from: https://api.sendgrid.com/api/mail.send.json to https://esp.embarkemail.com/sendgrid/api/mail.send.json and pass in a few extra values through the x-embarkeapi

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Tracking Email Using Microsoft Azure and the SendGrid Event Webhook (Part 2)

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Welcome back to the second part of my series about building a Windows Phone 8.1 app to track email powered by Microsoft Azure and SendGrid’s Event Webhook. If you haven’t read part one in this series, please do so before continuing. Recap In part one, we implemented the SendGrid Event Webhook listener using C# ASP.NET hosted on Microsoft Azure. In this post (part two), we will create a Windows Phone 8.1 app that displays email tracking data via the SendGrid Web API. In part three of this series, we will send push notifications from our SendGrid Event Webhook listener when

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JSON Web Tokens (Again!) and Koa.js

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A few weeks ago, I wrote about using JSON Web Tokens (JWT) as an alternative method of authentication using Go. The post itself contains a basic explanation about JWT and some links for content. In this post, I want to cover pretty much the same things using Koa, a new framework for Node.js. Koa is mostly a middleware framework which uses generators (only available under the Harmony flag) to control the flow of requests. The reason I mention that it’s a middleware framework is because it doesn’t come with most of the things you would expect a framework to provide, such

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